I had a three-stage granola plan

Stage One: Learn to make a nice granola that I like to eat. I don’t really like commercial granola and my (one?) previous attempt was not memorable. But the idea of granola is very appealing to me. It seems wholesome and filling and–this is key– is frequently a topping for yogurt.

Stage Two: The next step was to use granola as a gateway–a key that would unlock the portal (if you will permit some vague Buffy-speak)– to enjoyment of plain, unsweetened yogurt. I would like to like plain yogurt. Problem is, I barely like regular, sugary, fruity yogurt. In fact, it’s really only the Australian-style Wallaby’s yogurt that I like (it’s creamy and mild-tasting). But that stuff is expensive and full of sugar, and I have to go to Whole Foods or Fairway to get it (annoying).

So, for many reasons, the idea of switching to unsweetened probiotic bacteria cultures appeals to me. To that end, I have purchased a Wallaby’s plain yogurt tub and plan to learn how to enjoy eating it in some fashion. And granola is part of that plan. (As is agave syrup. Because I can’t go from all sweet to no sweet without some help.)

Stage Three: Wean myself off the granola and (perhaps) the agave and learn to tolerate plain yogurt with just some fruit and maybe honey, as recommended by Marion Nestle in her great (but disturbing) book What to Eat (short answer: nothing whose labeling contains a health claim).

Will this ever happen? About the unsweetened, plain yogurt, I don’t know. Frankly, it’s a long shot. And the bit about weaning myself off the granola now seems extremely unlikely as I have, on first attempt, located an ideal granola recipe, which has crack-like addictive properties.

I can’t say I wasn’t warned. I was. I just didn’t believe it that I’d be unable to stop eating it or that I might need to make a double batch. And now I am in a terrible way.

Orangette’s recipe is really easy to put together. I bought the chocolate and the shredded coconut weeks ago in anticipation of making this. The recipe, which is very slightly adapted from the Orangette recipe, which was in turn an adaptation of a recipe from David Lebovitz’s Perfect Scoop, calls for:

3 cups rolled oats

1/2 cup shredded coconut (I used a little less than 1/2 cup and used 40% reduced fat coconut to no apparent ill effect).

2T sugar

6T honey (I think next time I’d try it with just a little less sugar. Like maybe 1/2T less of the granulated and 3/4 or 1T less of the honey).

2T vegetable oil (I used canola)

Pinch of salt

1/2 cup almonds (which I thought I had. Alas, no. I subbed in mostly pecans with a few walnuts to excellent effect. I probably like those nuts better than almonds anyway, and they worked really well with the oats and honey.)

1/2 cup of bittersweet chocolate. I used a Sirius chocolate bar (from Iceland via Whole Foods), which is just my favorite right now. Creamy and delicious.

Preheat oven to 300F.

Mix the dry ingredients (except chocolate) in a bowl.

Then, in a small pot, carefully whisk the honey and oil together under low heat. When the honey is smooth and liquid-y, pour onto the granola mixture. Mix well and put mixture in a bake pan.

I have to admit that at this point, I had a crisis of confidence. I don’t know if it was confidence in the recipe, in myself, or in the concept of granola generally. But it all seemed too simple and bland. I almost panicked and added some other kind of flavoring. I considered vanilla extract and cinnamon. But then I remembered that cinnamon, especially, has ruined every batch of granola it was ever added to. And that I have not enjoyed vanilla flavored granola in the past. Too cloying. I decided to let the panic pass and just cook the damn granola.

As recommended, I stirred the granola half way through the 20 minunte cooking time. My crisis of confidence had not completely subsided at the 20 minute mark:

This looked too pale. Still too bland. I feared a granola-based disaster. I was about to find out, however, that I had just cooked up my very first batch of crack. Did you ever watch Breaking Bad? You know, the first time Hal cooks up meth. And then the drug dealer realizes that it’s pure and near perfect. It was like that.

I hesitated before eating the first spoonful. And before I chewed, again in mild state of panic, I popped a bit of the chopped chocolate (which I had not yet added to the hot granola) into my mouth so that I would not be overly afflicted by the plain granola. How unnecessary that turned out to be. My goodness, the warm, nutty, flavorful first bite did not even need the chocolate. But the chocolate! Oh, the chocolate! So so good.

And the first bite led the second and so on and so forth. Until I could not believe how much of the granola I could eat. Once I realized how good the granola was, I was in a rush to eat more of it, and I ended up adding the chocolate to the granola when it was still a bit too warm. But that turned out to be a delicious mistake. The chocolate, which I chopped sort of finely, melted in places and mixed together with the oats and nuts in the most wonderful clumps.

It would not be sad if you increased the chocolate in the granola by 50% or even 100%. Though, as it is, it’s not exactly low-calorie so I will try to hold off doing that.

I only brought a small amount of the granola to work today. It was meant to be a snack. In the afternoon. Perhaps with some yogurt (see 3-stage plan above) or a bit of milk. Yeah. The granola didn’t make it past 10am, and at first I was grateful I hadn’t brought more. It was so delicious that I was afraid to add milk to it (as recommended) for fear of ruining it. I did add a bit of milk to the last few bites, and I can confirm the granola is also excellent with milk. But by mid-afternoon, I soley regretted my temperance. I really needed more granola.

Problem now is that this granola is pretty much too good to eat with yogurt. So I’m back to square–or stage–one in the plan to conquer plain yogurt.

Postscript: After I wrote the post but before posting it, I started to wonder if maybe I had over-hyped the crack-like properties of the granola in my own mind. After I got home again though, I found myself standing over the granola container with a plastic spoon in my hand, just eating and eating it. Next thing I knew, everyone else was around me also eating it. It’s powerful stuff.

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “I had a three-stage granola plan

  1. So it was a granola day for you as well?

    For the record, a little vanilla can go a long way in a recipe toward sweetening it without adding sugar or chocolate. And cinnamon ruining granola, it gives it just a little kick. All things in moderation!

    I’ll try your recipe if you try mine, at the rate I’m going I’ll be done with my pound and a half before Saturday night.

  2. Badger

    Dude, before long, you will be eating octopus.

    Congratulations on the granola and on loving it. What about the commercial did you not like?

    And why would you have to learn to eat the plain yogurt without granola? I have it with both granola and fruit, and you wouldn’t have to learn to like honey since the granola (and fruit) will more then compensate for the loss of honey sweetness.

    Happy cooking Friday.

  3. Maggie

    Yeah, I’m not sure about the octopus still. The previous attempt stands out in my mind.

    Commercial granola has never satisfied. Too sweet or too strong or stale-tasting. I thought I might like the Bear Naked kind (http://www.bearnaked.com/estore/detail.aspx?catid=3&scid=16&_a=) but I think that is where I picked up the horror of vanilla in granola.

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